Rock Physics Influencer Profiles


Rock Physics Influencers program (RPI) is an initiative to provide short interview statements from nominated and selected eminent scientists who have been recognized to have made significant contributions and impacts that influenced changes to the rock physics community. The same set of questions was asked to capture different views from the selected influencers who work on different rock physics sub-disciplines. The influencers are invited to share their pathway for success, viewpoints they see in rock physics challenges, and advice they have for aspiring rock physicists. The program honors the prestigious scientists for their long standing research and continuous contributions in the area of rock physics. The profile is updated on a bi-monthly basis.

Upcoming RPI profiles:
14RPI, November-December 2017: Ran Bachrach (Schlumberger)
15RPI, January-February 2018: Paul Hatchell (Shell) 

2018 Influencers: Paul Hatchell (Shell), Tiziana Vanorio (Stanford), Rune Holt (NTNU), Dario Grana (U of Wyoming)


13RPI, September-October 2017: Boris Gurevich 

http://www.rockphysicists.org/rock-physics-influencer-profiles/the-13th-rpi-for-september-october-2017-boris-gurevich

Boris Gurevich obtained his Diploma (Russian equivalent of MSc) at Lomonosov Moscow State University in 1981 and started his career at the Moscow Institute of Geosystems. His early work included numerical analysis of NMR signals, and application of pattern recognition software to direct detection of hydrocarbons from seismic reflection data. It is in the Institute of Geosystems that he first met Sergey L. Lopatnikov who inspired Boris’s interest in poroelasticity. This subject became Boris’s long term obsession. His first steps in this area were focused on quantification of dispersion and attenuation due to mesoscopic flow in thinly-layered poroelastic systems. This research formed the basis of Boris’s PhD thesis (1988).  Read more ...




12RPI, July-August 2017: Michel Kemper 

https://sites.google.com/a/rockphysicists.org/rp-official-site/rock-physics-influencer-profiles/the-12th-rpi-for-july-august-michel-kemper

Michael Kemper is a geoscientist/petroleum engineer with 28 years’ experience in geophysics, petrophysics, and reservoir engineering. He spent the first 13 years with Shell International in The Hague, Nigeria, and London, during which time he made a number of contributions to the interface between petrophysics and geophysics. In May 1999, Kemper became team leader of petrophysics/petroacoustics at Ikoda Ltd., working on a wide variety of projects. It is during this time that RokDoc, now one of Ikon Science’s main products, was started. As one of the cofounders of Ikon Science, Kemper now serves as Director of Research and Innovation. In this role, he is responsible for the development of new, innovative, and impactful algorithms and workflows in the area of rock physics, seismic inversion, and numerical earth modelling in the Ikon Science software portfolio.  Read more ...



11RPI, May-June 2017: James Berryman

http://www.rockphysicists.org/rock-physics-influencer-profiles/the-11th-rpi-for-may-june-2017-jim-berryman

Jim has undergraduate degrees in Math and Physics from the University of Kansas (in Lawrence Kansas). His advanced degrees are in Physics (major in solid state physics) and an Electrical Engineering minor (in nonlinear electrical systems). He graduated in 1975. 

Jim did some postdoctoral  at the Math Research Center in Madison Wisconsin on nonlinear systems. Then joined CONOCO in Ponca City OK  1976 -- worked with Jerry Ware and Bob Stolt and some others at CONOCO. His time spent working at CONOCO was very important to his later career path, and gave him many directions that his research could go for various future jobs.  Read more ...



10RPI, March-April 2017: Manika Prasad

The 10th RPI for March-April 2017: Manika Prasad

Manika started her career with a geology degree from Bombay University. After hearing about plate tectonics from her undergraduate professor (Dr. Sethna), she was hooked! That fascination took her to Germany to study Marine Geophysics and Geology. After doing Marine Seismic interpretation during MSc, she started working on marine sediments – and became a lab rat. Manika has maintained this lab rat status migrating from Germany via India to the Mineral Physics Lab in University of Hawai’i and the Stanford Rock Physics and Borehole Group to the Center for Rock Abuse at Colorado School of Mines where she teaches and researches since late 2004. She is fortunate to have excellent hard-working students in the Rock Abuse lab so that she does not have to do anything.  



9RPI, January-February 2017: Bill Goodway

https://sites.google.com/a/rockphysicists.org/rp-official-site/rock-physics-influencer-profiles/bill2a.png?attredirects=0

I grew up and was educated in the UK near London. My early introduction to science came at Brentwood School, a 550-year-old boarding school in County Essex, just east of London where two imaginative teachers made physics, astronomy and geology the most compelling and interesting areas of study that shaped my future. I must admit that my passion for physics lead to the exclusion of many other subjects during those early years and later on in my choice and decision to pursue a career in geophysics. 

Following this I gained entry into University College London to pursue a degree in either geology or physics, as a major in geophysics was not offered at a B.Sc. level. I chose geology but was destined to end up working in geophysics through an enduring love of physics.  Read more ...


8RPI, November-December 2016Per Avseth


Per Avseth is currently an independent geophysical consultant based in Oslo and an adjunct professor (since 2008) in reservoir geophysics at NTNU in Trondheim. Per is an expert in rock physics and quantitative seismic interpretation. He has been working in the oil industry for more than 16 years, and he started his career as a seismic interpreter at Norsk Hydro Exploration in Oslo in 1994, after finishing his master of engineering degree in applied petroleum geoscience at NTH (now NTNU) in 1993. In the fall of 1994, he pursued graduate studies at Stanford University where he received his PhD in geophysics in 2000. In 2001, after a short post-doc position at the same institution, he started at Norsk Hydro Research Center in Bergen, where he worked as a research geophysicist for 5 years. After that, he was consulting for 6 years (2006-2012), first in in his own consulting company  Read more ...



7RPI, September-October 2016: Colin Sayers


Colin Sayers was born in the North West of England, and obtained a B.A. in Physics from Lancaster University in 1973. He then moved to Imperial College, London, where he received a D.I.C. (Diploma of Imperial College) in Mathematical Physics and a Ph.D. in Physics in 1976. The title of his thesis was “Correlation effects in the transition metals and the screening of non-transition element impurities in iron and nickel”. Following a two year post-doctorate fellowship at Imperial College, he joined the Materials Physics Division of the Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Harwell, U.K., in 1978, where he first began to work on elastic wave propagation in complex media.

He entered the oil and gas industry in 1986 to join Shell's Exploration and Production Laboratory  Read more ...





Serge A. Shapiro is a full Professor of Geophysics at the Freie Universität Berlin, Germany, and since 2004, Director of the PHASE (PHysics and Application of Seismic Emission) university consortium project.  His research interests include seismogenic processes, wave phenomena, seismic exploration and rock physics. 

Serge received his Diploma (a Russian equivalent to the Master degree) in Applied Geophysics from Lomonosov Moscow State University (1982) and his PhD (1987) from Moscow Research Institute VNIIGeosystem. The central topic of his PhD was the attenuation of seismic waves due to scattering and absorption in heterogeneous rocks. Read more ...






It took me about ten years to find a scientific problem that I really wanted to solve, that morphed into identifying other problems, and it all turned into a passion: that of using rock physics, in some form or fashion, to solve practical world problems. 

After obtaining a B. Sc. In Geophysics at C.S.M. and an M Sc in Exploration Geosciences at Stanford, I landed my first job in a seismic processing center, where I derived customized seismic attributes for field appraisal and reservoir development purposes. I processed and interpreted pre-stack data (AVO), and worked with facies classifications and pattern recognition techniques. It was here that I developed a desire to better understand and hopefully “decipher”, the quantitative messages hidden in seismic traces. 
Read more ...




When I started to study Geophysics, I knew one thing for certain: “I will not work in the Oil industry”. This was just after the Exxon Valdez oil spill and at the onset of the decommissioning debate of the Brent Spar. Big Oil was evil. Geophysics to me was all about earthquakes and volcanoes, and I saw myself in the tradition of the great explorers scaling volcanoes in the Andes and diving into the Mariana trench in a submarine. If this was to be the case, I should have chosen my University more carefully, as I started to study at Clausthal University. 

Clausthal University is a small college in the Harz Mountains, the eponymous location for the Hercynian Orogeny.  The college has a proud mining past and a focus on applied sciences, with one of the proudest inventions being the wire rope to replace hemp ropes and metal chains in mining. Read more ...




Erling Fjær is a chief scientist at SINTEF Petroleum Research in Trondheim, Norway. He also holds a position as adjunct professor at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. For the last 30 years, he has been working within the areas of rock mechanics and rock physics. 

Erling was educated in theoretical physics, followed by a PhD in solid state physics and a couple of years as post doc within the same subject. In the mid 80'ies, as the Norwegian petroleum industry was rapidly expanding, Erling was recruited to work within petroleum related research by a friend and former fellow student, Rune Holt, who suddenly found himself in charge of a large research project where most of the team had left for more exciting opportunities. Since then, they have worked in the same team on topics related to Read more ...  



      
Leon’s undergraduate degree was earned in 1964 at the California Institute of Technology, then and now a pre-eminent center of excellence in geophysics. In those days, the real excitement was in plate tectonics, planetary exploration, and the constitution of the earth’s deep interior, not in hydrocarbon exploration (oil cost just $4/BBL, pre-OPEC). So, Leon followed those ideas to Columbia University in New York City. His Ph.D. thesis, in 1969, dealt with seismic rock properties, and represented a new way to physically interpret seismic data for clues to the composition and crystal structure of the deepest interior of the earth.

In a post-doc position at the Centre Nationale de la Recherche Scientifique in Paris, another back at Caltech, and a faculty position at the State University of New York at Binghamton, Read more ...




Dave Dewhurst is a senior research scientist at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) and is based in Perth, Australia. He has a long standing interest in clays and shales, dating from the early 1990s, where he worked on application of soil mechanics techniques to consolidation, shearing and fluid flow in accretionary wedges. After this, his work focused on permeability and physical properties of compacting clays followed by research into polygonal fault systems in fine grained rocks. He moved to CSIRO in 1998, initially working on projects involving the physics behind overpressure prediction and mechanical and microstructural properties of faults for application to fault and top seal analysis. These days he leads multiple projects investigating the links between geomechanics, rock physics and petrophysics in both overburden and gas shales, Read more ...